Debunkers dot Org

A Tradition of Looking Behind the Curtain
It is currently Fri Nov 17, 2017 7:06 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 7:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:48 am
Posts: 4315
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
Military History January 2017
Letters
Japanese I-Boats
(Appended to an earlier thread)
News
Pokémon Go Skips Hallowed Grounds
Niantic is removing Pokémon’s from such sites as Arlington National Cemetery and the Holocaust Museum, and invites similar sites to submit requests.
New App Reveals Los Alamos Secrets
The app is available from Apple and Google and will allow users to take “virtual tours” of former buildings on the site.
Air Force to Use Enlisted Pilots
The USAF will use enlisted personal to fly drone missions; by 2020 it expects 70% of drone pilots to be enlisted.
Hiroshima Archive Maps Eyewitnesses
The city of Hiroshima has released a 3D map showing 1945 city with a modern overlay. Only partially translated to English so far.
Marines review first Iwo Jima flag raising
In the aftermath of having misidentified a participant in the iconic second flag raising on Iwo Jima, the USMC has announced that two men in a photograph of the first flag raising have also been misidentified.
Army developing new multipurpose grenade
The Enhanced Tactical Multipurpose Grenade (ETMP) can be changed from concussion to fragmentation mode by twisting the fuse assembly. It is supposed to replace the current M67 grenade in “a few years”.
Nazis Sell
Despite international protests Nazi memorabilia still commands high prices. Among recent items sold at auction are a pair of Hitler’s socks, Herman Goering’s Walther PPK, and an unopened roll of Wehrmacht Edelweiss brand toilet paper.
Article
A Yank in the SS
In October 1944, USAAF Lieutenant Martin James Monti went AWOL from his unit in India, hitched a ride on a C-46 to Cairo, talked his way on another flight to Tripoli, then on another to Naples. There, he again talked himself into being allowed to take an F-5E (the unarmed reconnaissance version of the P-38) for a “test flight”; he flew it to Milan and surrendered to the Germans. The Germans were delighted with the airplane but didn’t know what to make of Monti; first he was sent to a POW camp but was eventually able to convince his hosts he was a genuine defector. He was enrolled in SS Standarte Kurt Eggers and began making propaganda broadcasts (under a false name). He apparently had a falling out with Mildred Gillars, the US-born actress who was “Axis Sally”, and was ordered to a fighting unit at the Italian front, where he surrendered in 1945. Apparently he was able to convince his captors that he was merely a POW who had been given a SS uniform by Italian partisans to help him get through German lines. He confessed he had stolen the F-5E but claimed it was to conduct a “one-man war” on the Germans; his propaganda activities weren’t known yet. He was sentenced to 15 years but the sentence was commuted to time served in 1946 – contingent on re-enlisting in the Army, which he did. By 1948 he was a sergeant; however researchers had identified him by then and immediately on receiving an honorable discharge he was arrested, retried, and after confessing he was sentenced to 25 years in Leavenworth. He was paroled in 1960 and died in 2000. Despite psychological interviews, Monti never explained why he defected; especial why he did it after it was pretty clear the Third Reich was going down.

Geology November 2016
The end of the Ediacaran: Two new exceptionally preserved body fossil assemblages from Mount Dunfee, Nevada
There have been a lot of reports about Ediacaran fossils recently; the site mentioned here is the closest to me (although Mount Dunfee doesn’t look that easy to access). It’s also the youngest known Ediacaran assemblage, with the same strata (Esmerelda Member of the Deep Spring Formation) containing Ediacaran and Cambrian fossils.

Science 14 October 2016
News in Depth
Spy agencies team up with National Academies
The Intelligence Community Studies Board at the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine will cooperate with the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to study how social and behavioral science might improve national security. Once cited research area is detection of lying; the intelligence agencies reportedly poured millions of dollars into mechanical (polygraph) and behavioral (interrogation) methods for detecting deception, but got few results. Critics worry association with a spy agency will compromise their research careers.
News in Depth
Chinese scientist jailed over theft of hybrid corn
(Appended to an earlier thread)
Insights
The trouble with negative emissions
The authors, with the University of Manchester and the University of Uppsala, argue that “negative emissions” are “an unjust and high-stakes gamble”. Many of the countries that signed on to the Paris climate change protocol are using or planning to use negative emissions credits to meet their carbon quotas; negative emissions include things like reforestation, afforestation, and biomass energy plus carbon capture and storage. The authors claim that although these are politically popular they shift carbon mitigation to the future rather than taking action now. In particular, they note that the BECCS idea would require fully half the world’s energy to be generated from biomass with the carbon dioxide generated captured and stored in long-term geological repositories.
A microbial route from coal to gas
Report
Methane production from coal by a single methanogen
Coal-bed methane is both a source of natural gas for fuel and a source of greenhouse gas (the article claims about 7% of atmospheric methane comes from coal). However, it was previously unknown just how coal bed methane forms. It turns out to be a previously unknown methanogen which in turn us a previously unknown metabolic pathway to generate coal methane; other methanogens can only use relatively small carbon-containing molecules to generate methane. The bacteria are using still unidentified methyl transferase enzymes. The authors note the ability to convert coal directly to methane opens up many potential industrial applications. Note and full report.
Reports
How economic, humanitarian, and religious concerns shape European attitudes toward asylum seekers
The authors asked 18000 voters in 15 European countries to evaluate 180000 profiles for asylum seekers. The profiles were randomly generated and varied on nine attributes. The attributes were (1) consistency of testimony (why they were seeking asylum), varying from none through minor to major; (2) Gender; (3) Country of origin (Syria, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Eritrea, Pakistan, Ukraine, Iraq); (4) Age (21, 38 or 62); (5) Occupation (Unemployed, Cleaner, Farmer, Accountant, teacher, Doctor); (6) Vulnerability (None, PTSD, torture victim, no surviving family, disabled) (7) Reason for emigrating (political persecution, religious persecution, ethnic persecution, economic opportunity); (8) Religion (Christian, agnostic, Muslim); (9) Language (Fluent, broken, none). The research found employability, vulnerability, and religious or ethnic persecution as favorable factors, and inconsistent testimony, male gender, country of origin (all except Syria), age, desire for economic opportunity, non-Christian religion and poor language skills as unfavorable factors. The results were consistent across the European countries studied and also consistent with whether the application reviewer identified as left or right, young or old, low or high education, or below or above median income.

Science 7 October 2016
News
Acquittal ends L’Aquilla saga
(Appended to an earlier thread)
Ideology shapes view on climate
Shocking.
Trudeau says Canada will put a price on carbon
Starting in 2018, $7.62/tonne, rising by $7.62/tonne annually to a maximum of $38.11 in 2022. (I don’t know why the numbers don’t add up; must be a fraction in there somewhere that the article doesn’t mention). It seems like the tax will only apply in provinces that haven’t set up their own system (British Columbia and Alberta have) but that’s not clear from the article. Three provincial environmental ministers protested by walking out of the meeting where the tax was announced. The article doesn’t mention which three.
News in depth
U.S. charges journal publisher with misleading authors
The Federal Trade Commission has charged OMICS Group, a publisher of open-access scientific journals, with false and misleading statements about its pricing, editorial staff, and peer-review practices. Reportedly OMICS charged authors large fees for publishing but did not provide peer-review services. In some cases OMICS took over previously respected scientific journals without informing authors of the change in management. OMICS is also charged with using author’s names without permission to promote journals and conferences, falsely claiming that journals were indexed on PubMed, and claiming false impact factors for journals. When a librarian at the University of Colorado called attention to these practices OMICS threatened a defamation lawsuit.
Policy Forum
Social norms as solutions
The article discusses “social norms” as pressure to adhere to what as seen to be socially desirable results. It also notes that there can be “tipping points” when a behavior changes from socially acceptable to socially disapproved; examples cited are smoking, foot binding in China, and fertility norms. In order for social norms in general and tipping points to work, the desired behavior has to be easily observable; as examples antibiotic misuse and carbon emissions are not and no tipping point is expected. There is some small lip service to the idea that social norms might be different in different societies; it’s noted that laws on indoor smoking have been observed rigorously in Norway and lead to overall smoking decline, while nearly identical laws have had no discernable effect on smoking and smoking behavior in Greece.

The University of Chicago Magazine Fall 2016
Letters
The University of Chicago caused a stir in the MSM when a letter to incoming freshmen noted that the University does not support “trigger warnings” or “safe spaces” for students. Letters to the magazine were equivocal, with two writers each pro and con. The “con” (against the University policy, for safe spaces and trigger warnings) argued that not only was it necessary to ensure that all ideas could be brought forward, but also that people who might be afraid to speak could do so. The “pro” voices (for the letter, against safe spaces and trigger warnings) argued that political correctness “police” have succeeded in intimidation and censorship on most campuses. I don’t know; I imagine it’s possible that somebody need to know in advance that a book or class might discuss rape or torture so they could prepare for it; just because I don’t have those feelings myself doesn’t mean that somebody else might.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 10:56 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 12:03 pm
Posts: 1075
Location: Surfing thru Cyberspace
Quote:
The University of Chicago Magazine Fall 2016
Letters
The University of Chicago caused a stir in the MSM when a letter to incoming freshmen noted that the University does not support “trigger warnings” or “safe spaces” for students. Letters to the magazine were equivocal, with two writers each pro and con. The “con” (against the University policy, for safe spaces and trigger warnings) argued that not only was it necessary to ensure that all ideas could be brought forward, but also that people who might be afraid to speak could do so. The “pro” voices (for the letter, against safe spaces and trigger warnings) argued that political correctness “police” have succeeded in intimidation and censorship on most campuses. I don’t know; I imagine it’s possible that somebody need to know in advance that a book or class might discuss rape or torture so they could prepare for it; just because I don’t have those feelings myself doesn’t mean that somebody else might.

I'm still agnostic on the whole safe-spaces and safety pin thing. The current generation of college brats has been coddled to the point of apparently not understanding that there are different views from their own (or their family's since that's all they've been exposed to) and that different isn't (necessarily) bad. I weep for that generation when it comes time for them to make actual decisions that require external input that doesn't match their own worldview. But I think that college is a good place to look for and hopefully find yourself before turning loose on the open market. But for the folks not going to college? That's a different kettle of fish entirely and we should expect they'll stick to their families' worldviews adamantly because clearly they are right.

Ultimately the safety pins and safe spaces won't do anyone a lick of good if they don't open their minds to alternative viewpoints. That's a maturity thing more than an age or college thing. In the meantime, my kids will not be wearing safety pins or asking about safe spaces. Nor will they be helicopter-parented by us. And they'll be on their own at the end of their high school careers (except, of course, for the 529 monies for college or trade school). Sink or swim. Make your safe and unsafe spaces yourself. Expect nothing from anyone else and you won't be disappointed and you may be pleasantly surprised on your journey.

_________________
I don't run. If you see me running, you probably should run, too.

BetterOffRacing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2016 1:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:07 pm
Posts: 792
setnahkt wrote:
Trudeau says Canada will put a price on carbon
Starting in 2018, $7.62/tonne, rising by $7.62/tonne annually to a maximum of $38.11 in 2022. (I don’t know why the numbers don’t add up; must be a fraction in there somewhere that the article doesn’t mention). It seems like the tax will only apply in provinces that haven’t set up their own system (British Columbia and Alberta have) but that’s not clear from the article. Three provincial environmental ministers protested by walking out of the meeting where the tax was announced. The article doesn’t mention which three.


Our darling and handsome Prime Minister is a fool. With the election of Trump he will readily put Canada at a disadvantage with this. But then this is the guy that eulogized Castro and has accomplished very nearly nothing since being elected over a year ago. And it is very Canadian to do stuff to put us at a disadvantage (I hearken back to the Ben Johnson saga when we became the only clean nation at the Olympics for a while. And won nothing).

Regarding the provinces that walked out for certain it was Saskatchewan. The other two I'm uncertain about but I'd guess New Brunswick which has a large oil refining industry is one of them. Possibly Manitoba since we currently have a right of center government in power but that's not assured. Ontario also has it's own wacky carbon schemes but Ontario jumped the shark in so many ways of late it's not remotely a surprise. I do owe Ontario a debt of thanks for taking the right honorable Glen Murray away from us (their environment minister and our former and utterly inept mayor - bright sided is an apt description of this character).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2016 11:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 12:20 pm
Posts: 849
Location: Tantalizingly close to Colorado
El Buggo wrote:
Regarding the provinces that walked out for certain it was Saskatchewan. The other two I'm uncertain about but I'd guess New Brunswick which has a large oil refining industry is one of them.


I would assume Alberta as well. Hey, he did just approve an oil pipeline to the Pacific at least.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2016 11:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:07 pm
Posts: 792
barisax wrote:
El Buggo wrote:
Regarding the provinces that walked out for certain it was Saskatchewan. The other two I'm uncertain about but I'd guess New Brunswick which has a large oil refining industry is one of them.


I would assume Alberta as well. Hey, he did just approve an oil pipeline to the Pacific at least.


Reasonable assumption but incorrect. I only got one right. It was Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. Odd that New Brunswick didn't go, but I suspect it's all related to who's in power in the respective provinces.

Alberta nope. Alberta lost their minds and elected an NDP government. I think Americans would call it communist, or darn close. We've had one for years in Manitoba and while they kinda sorta improve social services, the debt load they leave behind is massive. Alberta's government that is in power right now wants to shut down the oil sands. I kid you not. Definition of insanity right there. Well ok, not insanity, economic suicide.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2016 11:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 12:20 pm
Posts: 849
Location: Tantalizingly close to Colorado
El Buggo wrote:
Alberta nope. Alberta lost their minds and elected an NDP government. I think Americans would call it communist, or darn close. We've had one for years in Manitoba and while they kinda sorta improve social services, the debt load they leave behind is massive. Alberta's government that is in power right now wants to shut down the oil sands. I kid you not. Definition of insanity right there. Well ok, not insanity, economic suicide.


So, they want to go back to beaver pelts and maple syrup? :o


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: from current journals as of 2016 11 30
PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2016 12:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 6:07 pm
Posts: 792
barisax wrote:
El Buggo wrote:
Alberta nope. Alberta lost their minds and elected an NDP government. I think Americans would call it communist, or darn close. We've had one for years in Manitoba and while they kinda sorta improve social services, the debt load they leave behind is massive. Alberta's government that is in power right now wants to shut down the oil sands. I kid you not. Definition of insanity right there. Well ok, not insanity, economic suicide.


So, they want to go back to beaver pelts and maple syrup? :o


Green energy folks, that's the ticket. Again, I kid you not. They believe green industries will be money makers. I'd be happy if they were but I'm not delusional and have a minimal understanding of physics and energy conservation.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Americanized by Xaphos © 2007, 2008 phpBB.fr