Debunkers dot Org

A Tradition of Looking Behind the Curtain
It is currently Thu Sep 21, 2017 9:04 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 11:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 8204
Two suggestions on removing a leech:

Quote:
Thankfully, there are two proven ways to remove a leech without risk of infection. The first is to relax, watch the leech, and admire its color patterns, and its biology while it finishes its meal. This should take less than half an hour. Thirty minutes well spent contemplating the complexities of life!


No, thank you.

Quote:
If you're in a hurry, though, the other method is simply finding the head end and pushing it sideways until it releases the suction. ... And for Pete's sake, put it back in the water so it can lead a normal happy leech life!


No. Kill it. Kill it with fire.

See, this is why I don't like PBS.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 1:38 am 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:48 am
Posts: 4292
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
According to wikipedia this is actually good advice. Apparently if you use one of the traditional leech removal methods - salt, kerosene, arc welder - the leech will vomit as it dies and potentially infect the wound with whatever pathogens it might carry. It would be interesting to do some tests.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 12:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 8204
The fingernail under the oral disk part is fine; in fact, that's what brought me to the article. Leeches got mentioned in that Burma book whose overall story was so good and whose details were so unreliable, so I decided it was time to add a word about leeches to the jungle article at my favorite waste of time, and I was looking for reliable information.

It's the catch-and-release part I'm rolling my eyes so hard at that the cats have a new pair of toys. (to borrow a turn of phrase)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 12:57 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:48 am
Posts: 4292
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
Well, at one time annelids - because of the segmentation - were thought to be distant relatives of vertebrates. Turned out not to be the case (well, they're still distant relatives, just much more distant). And leeches have returned to the medical field - they're sort of service animals now. Getting one a a leash would probably be a little difficult. Hmmm. I wonder if they could be genetically engineered to do liposuction instead of blood.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 1:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 8204
So annelids and chordates turn out to be more distant than was thought?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:33 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:48 am
Posts: 4292
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
The original idea was segmentation was a shared derived character and thus annelids, arthropods, and chordates were sister groups. (See It's a Long Way From Amphioxus). However, the embryology is way off; annelids and arthropods are protostomes, schizocoelous and have determinate cleavage while chordates are deuterostomes, enterocoelous and indeterminate cleavage. To add insult to injury, the rules of zoological naming priority mean that Amphioxus is now correctly known as Branchiostoma.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 8204
Not sure about the indeterminate cleavage in chordates, but the other points seem good.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 12:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 12:20 pm
Posts: 848
Location: Tantalizingly close to Colorado
I'll file this way in the back of my head since I'll be living in the desert for the foreseeable future. What should I do about a rattlesnake bite while mountainbiking?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 3:25 am 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:48 am
Posts: 4292
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
Watch the snake, admire its biology, and contemplate the color patterns on your leg as it swells.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Really bad advice from a leech expert
PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2014 10:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 3562
Location: Toronto
:lol:

Always a pleasure.

_________________
Winter is coming.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Americanized by Xaphos © 2007, 2008 phpBB.fr